TWOWEEKS News: We are building a house at Lily of the Valley!

August 3, 2012 § Leave a comment

Aside from the usual tasks at hand on our April 2012 trip to South Africa my other focus on the trip was planning for the future and our ongoing partnership with Lily of the Valley Orphanage.

As time has gone on we have rolled out more trips and had more and more volunteers donating their time and sharing their skills with the team at Lily and communities in the surrounding townships. However, as Lily has also expanded, the pressures on accommodation have become more acute and so TWOWEEKS is now building a house there. Our very first TWOWEEKS home that will accommodation both long and short-term volunteers!

Our aim is that this will not only serve as a place for our volunteers to stay whilst they are working at Lily but also serve as a base for this region as requests for help from other volunteers and NGOs has increased in recent months, if not years.

TWOWEEKS has been working with Lily for over six years and our team and volunteers have enjoyed our time working with the staff and volunteers at Lily and within the surrounding communities immensely. We initially started out as a couple of doctors looking after the children at the orphanage but as time has gone on and our remit and vision has developed and extended we have found ourselves being approached by other organisations, charities and NGOs in the Durban region. They have all asked us to assist them with their needs and it is part of the TWOWEEKS vision to work with organisations that have sustainable and ongoing enterprises and reach out to the community.

With our progression and success, issues with accommodation have arisen which have meant we have had to turn volunteers away due to a limited capacity to accommodate them at Lily. So, with this and other issues in mind we would like to address this by building our very own accommodation – our first ‘TWOWEEKS Home’. This will serve as a base for our volunteers to stay in, to assist not only with the children at Lily of the Valley but also with other partners and organisations in the surrounding areas. Our vision is to develop a student volunteer and elective program for students training in different professions. These would initially include medical, nursing and dental students who need experience in a different environment but who could also assist the staff and volunteers at Lily and contribute to sustainable enterprises.

TWOWEEKS HOME REQUIREMENTS

TWOWEEKS now proposes that we build a dedicated home at Lily for future volunteers – both long and short term. We will be responsible for the fundraising to build and furnish this house.

We will seek contributions from elective students and corporate sponsorship to pay for overheads such as running water and electricity so that Lily does not incur any additional costs.

WHAT IS NEEDED?

  • A four to six bedroom home, which can accommodate two people per bedroom
  • Ideally two separate living areas – a lounge and a kitchen/diner
  • Two bathrooms/shower rooms
  • Ideally two rooms with en-suite shower rooms which would be reserved for long-term volunteers
  • Secure storage space/cupboards
  • The property would be located near to other residential sites. We have already started looking at accommodation near to Bushwillow
  • Opportunity to extend the property with a view to accommodating long-term volunteers
  • Areas that enable outside living and relaxation

WHY IS IT NEEDED?

Back in 2010, I was part of a team that had medical volunteers and we did our usual trip into the community to see the sick and dying. One of the people we saw was an elderly lady and her mature son who had severe learning disabilities. He was in his 30s and this poor lady was struggling with his care. She loved her son dearly but found it difficult to ensure that he did not wander away and cause himself harm. He also suffered with epilepsy and so ensuring this added issue did not lead to serious harm caused her to lock him away in a small wooden shed to ensure that he did not get lost and that she could care for him as she herself did not have the best mobility and health.

We obviously were all affected by what we saw and other members of the team had seen similar cases such as this in the community. Other situations became evident when volunteers assisted in the local township schools and saw mature adults with learning difficulties put into corners and left to their own devices (with supervision to ensure that they did not come to harm). However, there was no dedicated therapy or education and so we quickly concluded that a teacher with special needs training and assistance from an occupational therapist would help people in these situations immensely. They would not only provide assistance for the time they were there, but also try and impart some knowledge of even simple things that could be done by teachers and parents/carers to help make these individuals lives better.

Remarkably, on our return back to the UK we held an introductory meeting soon after and a teacher with special needs experience attended and expressed an interest in joining the trip going out later that year. However, after all was said and done, there was not sufficient accommodation available at Lily at that time and we were unable to utilise this lady’s skills. It was an opportunity lost and it was at that stage that we realised that if we are to continue to develop what we are doing and expand, we need a more long-term solution for our accommodation and storage of equipment. Lily has their hands full feeding and providing for their 126 children and we have all felt the effects of the recession so money to build further accommodation is limited. We have decided to do it on their behalf and raise the money ourselves.

We have the site and land set aside for us and we also have the plans and vision of building a 6-bedroom property. Now we need £10,000 to complete it. Please join us in completing this task so that more people can go and help.

Any ideas or extra pairs of hands to help us with our cause would be very much appreciated.Join us and turn this house into a home, a TWOWEEKS home.

Karen Patten | karen@twoweeks.org.uk

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TWOWEEKS Volunteer Profile: Kamal Patel

February 14, 2012 § Leave a comment

Kamal Patel tell us about how she got involved with TWOWEEKS and why she wanted to volunteer on her recent trip to Lily of the Valley in  November, 2011. Kamal also held a ‘housewarming fundraising night’ for us recently and her friends and family generously gave £480 that evening.

Tell us about yourself.

I have just completed an IT contract at Nomura PLC which is a Japanese bank in London.

My background is mainly IT and business skills but I have also taught English as a foreign language both here and in Taiwan over the last few years.

I love all sport but especially football and cricket – I used to have a season ticket at Arsenal and still follow their exploits avidly!

How did you hear about TWOWEEKS?

I met Karen through a friend and she inspired me with the idea of being able to help even if you only had two weeks to spare. The notion of being a cog in the wheel where you come and set up something that someone else could take over seemed make sense – i.e. that a defined realistic piece of work that could be  achieved in 2 weeks and handed over to the next person who came along.

Tell us about your fundraising night.

I thought I would let my friends know about the charity and my plans and having just moved into a new flat I thought it would be an ideal opportunity to promote TWOWEEKS and raise some funds whilst enjoying ourselves. The party would have taken place anyway and as I would have supplied the food and drinks my friends were requested to supply any donations.

Trip Update to Lily of the Valley in March 2011

February 14, 2012 § Leave a comment


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Trip Update to Lily of the Valley in August 2011

February 14, 2012 § 1 Comment

We arrived on Sunday the 14th of August in a very sunny Cape Town. After a two-hour stop we boarded a plane to Durban. We had a 30-minute stop in a grey Port Elisabeth and we landed in a wet and very cold Durban. Jumpers, fleece and winter gear were needed. It was great to see old friends. The kids are older, taller and more cheeky and the new arrival baby Rhain was only one week old.

On day one Natasha, a school nurse with a past A&E background, and I were in the clinic. It was a quiet day with less than 20 people. We had meetings in the afternoon with the management of the children’s village as Natasha had the exciting task of initiating sexual health/sex education workshops in Lily. The meetings were very positive and at times challenging as Lily is a Christian orphanage.

We went into the township to see those not well enough to attend the clinic and although I have been here six times now, the poverty still strikes me – especially that in this day and age we still have no running water, no electricity and heating in a lot of the houses! But as always the people of Mophela and Sankonthse take it into their stride and are always welcoming to us.

The sex education and sexual health workshops were very positive and well received by our kids. A lot of questions were asked and we will be doing the same for the Lily Primary School staff and on Friday we were in the local Secondary School called Gabi Gabi to talk to their teenagers. HIV and AIDS and teenage pregnancies are very high here and we want to inform the teenagers to be careful, use protection and to be aware of the STDs around.

The weekends were really relaxing. One weekend we woke up early in the morning to go for a drive in the game reserve Tala, our neighbour. We managed to see all the animals; giraffes, hippos, rhinos, ostriches, zebras, wildebeest, and kuddus were all waiting for us. The beach in Durban, Umhlanga Rocks, was a lovely place to chillax in the afternoon. Afterwards some shopping in a big shopping mall in Durban and then the next day the bright and warm African sun was out and we spent time with some of the other volunteers on a hill in the gardens watching the wildlife in Bushwood Villa, on the border of Lily and Tala.

The work was varied. One day someone was unwell and for a minute I was back in my A&E years. The patient needed IV fluids (a drip) and hospitalisation. Because of illness the nurse practitioner was off and Tash and I were manning the entire clinic. We had seen 20+ patients until that point and we never knew what would be coming our way.

These trips always make me look at life differently. You appreciate what you have even more and it also makes me realise that the work of TWOWEEKS has been incredible. We have been coming to this place for 5-6 years now and people know us, welcome us and the work and look how we have grown.

Words by Patricia Rijsenburg

Trip Update to Lily of the Valley in November 2011

January 22, 2012 § Leave a comment

Our Trip to Lily of the Valley in November 2011 was full of emotion, challenges, successes, trials and appreciation. I feel renewed, refreshed and grateful. We did so much; ranging from piloting a new health program for children in the local communities surrounding Lily, working with local social workers on a suspected case of child abuse, nursing a very sick child with AIDs and conducting medical examinations on children in need. Within seeing 20 children, Samina and I had picked up two heart murmurs, two urinary infections, one likely case of diabetes and three children with HIV/AIDS. And that was just one class in one school. The possibilities to identify more cases of illness and disease is immense! We are proud that we were here at the start and that from our past efforts a bigger program will be rolled out to this district and perhaps even the whole of Durban which would be fantastic. Because of the huge need, we were told that our volunteers would always be needed with such a program.

We had a lot of meetings to establish links with old and new institutions, NGOs and people who TWOWEEKS need to work with in South Africa and who are related to the new ‘regime’ at Lily. Our trip was not free of sadness. One of the reports I completed was on a three-year-old girl who I reviewed in a school in a district adjacent to Lily as suspicions of child abuse arose due to her behaviour when examined and further medical tests undertaken. We made sure that we sought advice from social workers, psychologists and Lily before proceeding as it was a sensitive issue that meant potentially accusing innocent parents of child abuse, which we knew would not go down well with that community and news would spread also.

We discussed the situation and our suspicions with the head of the local social worker division and followed her advice to report our concerns to the headmistress of the school. She confirmed our suspicions and said that this child was always sad, withdrawn, never played and always sat alone in a corner. However, she went on to say that she would not do anything as there would be repercussions to herself, family and position at the school. “I know her stepfather”, she said, “and it would not be good for me.” Despite our protestations, the Zulu nurse attending this meeting with us explained that this is a real concern and retaliation is commonplace with situations like this. Needless to say we left that meeting very upset, confused and disappointed but in truth I do not live in this lady’s shoes and therefore cannot pass judgement. However, we could not abandon this child and so we are now handing over our concern to the social workers for them to help this little girl. We need to protect our children and sadly abuse if rife in South Africa – a bewildering and unpallatable fact that needs to be addressed.

Another sad situation arose when we tried to help a 12-year-old girl called Thobeka who had come to Lily about three months ago. She had full-blown AIDS and fell ill three weeks after arriving at Lily. She was admitted to hospital back in June and had remained there ever since. She had previously suffered with meningitis and as a result had paralysis on the right side of her body. But she made progress and picked up whilst admitted in hospital. However, South African public hospital care is very different from that in the UK and on the ward children are jampacked in together with all ailments (contagious or otherwise). So she not only had a low white cell count (i.e. AIDS) to deal with but she also caught TB and then meningitis again. Her immune system was just too weak.

Samina and I were asked to review her and find out if there was any way to improve her situation and prognosis. We went to the hospital that was a good 40 minutes drive away and spoke with the resident paediatrician in charge of her care. On our first visit he expressed hope and a determination to fight in her corner but as the days passed and she deteriorated further, it became clear that her chances of survival were fading fast and so we tried our best to get her transferred to a palliative care hospital as the care she was receiving at this particular hospital was abysmal. In South African public hospitals, parents are only allowed to stay with their children if they are being breast fed, so most of the children there stay alone. And even though Thobeka was an orphan, the Lily volunteers and staff at the village and clinic tried their very best to see her as often as they could in that small window of visiting hours, which was between 1-3pm each day. When we visited, Thobeka was often dirty, lying in soiled sheets and the nurses showed no care or attention. Her lips were cracked and sore and she often cried and moaned when we were there. Bless Thobeka. It was so hard leaving her when we visited and although we bought her cuddly toys and things to brighten her bed situated in a dimly lit area of the ward, it was not the same as a touch of a hand or a stroke of her brow which she appreciated when we were there. The Lily long-term volunteers also did what they could and two even took a guitar and sang to her. Whilst sitting with her I thought about all the people who ask, ‘What can I do in two weeks?’ Merely having a volunteer sit with this little girl each day and perhaps with the other children on the ward would have made such a big difference to her suffering.

We tried so hard to help this little girl but money was always the barrier. To move her to a semi-private hospital would have cost £100 a day and we tried to think of ways to raise the money; phonecalls, emails etc. We just needed time. With the global economic downturn, NGOs and charities such as Lily and TWOWEEKS have all felt the effects of reduced donations and cash flow and if you take £100 a day and give it to this one child, you take it away from helping the remaining 129 children who live at Lily. So we tried to think of ways to help little Thobeka and we even went to a hospice and asked for their help. A plan began to develop that if they could accept Thobeka in a side room and Lily hired a nurse to sit with her (a far cheaper option than transferring her to a private hospital), then she would be cared for and be nearer to Lily so that more people could visit. We just needed more time. But sadly on the 30th November we learned that Thobeka had died that morning. So sad. And whilst her suffering is no more, I just wish we could have made her final days with us more comfortable and surrounded by love. Lily now plan to build a small hospice facility to care for children in situations just like this and we hope to support them with this aim. Poor little Thobeka, she had such a hard struggle and who knows how her life was before she came to Lily. I pray she is now at peace.

Kamal did some stellar work at Lily and focused her time on working with the older children who will one day grow to adulthood and have to leave Lily. Most of them have lived at Lily for most of their lives and so the concept of leaving and having to fend for themselves is quite foreign to them and now being addressed in a big way. Kamal did a workshop on job interviews with the children to get them thinking about the process of looking and securing a job. She also worked a lot in the IT class which is situated near the clinic in the community projects that Lily has developed. She taught adults and children from the local community how to navigate around the net, search for things and jobs and produce a CV and covering letter. It was really touching as on the last day a couple of her students that she had taught from the community came up to her and said thank you and took pictures with her. It was smiles all round and I felt very proud of her as it was clear that she had made a difference to these two ladies who expressed their appreciation so warmly.

So that was our trip. There is still so much to be done but we are on the case.

Words by Karen Patten

TWOWEEKS March 2011 Trip Update: Lily of the Valley Orphanage in South Africa

January 22, 2012 § Leave a comment

The march trip to South Africa had four pharmacists travel, along with Richard (who also happens to be my brother) and I. The pharmacists did medication reviews in the community and also assisted with the clinic and the children at Lily. They really opened my eyes to what pharmacists can do. But they did not stop there – they also did fundraising by climbing Mount Kilimanjaro and jumped out of a plane for TWOWEEKS as well. Bless them! And after coming back from their ‘world tour of adventures’, they continued to look at ways to get cheap meds from drug companies to help supply the Lily clinic.

Richard was meant to help with food distribution, but as is often the case in South Africa, things rarely go to plan. So we arrived at Lily to be informed that they had already distributed the food that they had for the month. He was understandably really disappointed, but ended up working with the older children at Lily and playing football with the men in the township as there is a pitch at Lily that many of the township folks come to. Now, this may sound a bit frivolous, but it was in fact a very good thing. We often go out into the community and a lot of our preparation for volunteers focuses on educating them about being safe. Crime is a real problem in South Africa and all of our volunteers must be aware and prepared. But after Richard played football and also went to a football tournament in the township, we subsequently went into the township and the young men that we had often viewed with suspicion and caution were now asking after Richard and knew that I was his sister. They even went as far as to compliment him on his ability to play football. After this, our trips into the community seemed less threatening and in truth, less stressful. It was a really good thing and we felt safer for it.

Words by Karen Patten

TWOWEEKS August Trip to Lily of the Valley Orphanage in South Africa

January 22, 2012 § Leave a comment

August heralded a further trip to Lily comprising of Patricia (trustee and doctor) and Natasha (a nurse). They had aimed to assist with the clinic at Lily, but it turned out that they did more than assist as the doctor that usually runs the clinic at Lily and the nurse practitioner both became unwell just after Patricia arrived. She therefore ended up running the clinic singlehandedly, bless her. She was so busy seeing patients and from all reports, did an excellent job.

Natasha assisted in the clinic, but also did some sex education with the older children at Lily. Now in the past, Lily, being a Christian organisation, taught abstinence regarding this sensitive matter. However, we had been saying that whilst this is a good idea in some respects, it is not realistic in others and now that our children are living longer and getting older, it is important to address this situation as a number of them have HIV & AIDS. Well, it took a few years, but Lily finally agreed and 2011 was our first year with ‘Sex Ed’ and it went down a storm. In fact, news of Natasha’s work shops spread and she ended up going to a local school in the township and another orphanage linked to Lily called Makaphutu. On my return in November, people were still asking after her and whether she could come back and talk to their children or students. It nearly got to the stage that I was
taking bookings – I was so proud.

But again, that was not where her dedication and passion ended. Natasha came back to the UK and realising that a lot of the older girls were without bras (due to underwear being a luxury there), she is now in the process of setting up a charity to provide bras (and pants) to the older girls at Lily and perhaps one day, the ladies in the township as well. Again – fantastic!!! So once again, even thought someone was present at the project for only two weeks, they have gone on to do other things and continue the work they started. Natasha is hoping to return to Lily in 2012.

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